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Male Head Voice (Singing Teachers)

6 replies, 5 voices Last updated by  Veronica Wakeling 3 weeks, 3 days ago
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    Topic
  • #10381

    Andy Smith
    Participant

    Hello singing teachers. I’m looking for some advice. I have a male student who wants to strengthen their head voice. Unfortunately, they seem, to me, to be stuck in a breathy falsetto and not connecting with the stronger head voice. I’ve tried all my tricks and ideas without much success; what I’m suggesting should work, but it isn’t really doing anything to help. Does anyone have any crafty ways to engage head voice that might help please?

Viewing 6 replies - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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  • #10420

    Chris Harknett
    Participant
    @Chris_Harknett
    Points: 39.821

    I get my students to pretend they’re on a roller coaster and do a big “Woooo-hooo”. Then turn the woo into a descending five note scale right in the upper head voice. Doesn’t work for everyone but I’d say the majority of the time this helps (if it is used consistently in short bursts)

    #10421

    Guest Teacher
    Member
    @Guest-Teacher
    Points: 11.764

    Yes I have created an entire series on how to access the head voice particularly for the male voice! Message me!

    #10401

    Eliza Jane Fyfe
    Participant
    @Eliza-Fyfe
    Points: 2,507.909
    Current Forum LeaderMaster Teacher / Student

    Hi Andy!

    What have you tried? I’ve managed to solve this issue by using these methods below, but you may have already tried them:

    First, strengthen the high chest voice, before the transition:
    – Call out “Hey!” “Oi!” “Yeah!” to access a clear, high chest tone which gets the reflex strong sound out
    – Scales that are “ma” rather than vowel sounds as it stops too much airflow
    – 5th Slides on a hum to “iron” out the breathiness and connect with the core

    Then when it flips to falsetto:
    – Suddenly dip the volume so they’re not pushing more air through (I find that they forget that this is a much less “forced” sound than the chest voice) it has to be just the right balance of airflow in order to create a clear, pure tone. It may only be achieved at an even higher part of their voice
    – Get them to sing like they’re yawning to get the back of their throat to open
    – Also think of a “choir boy” or “opera” sound to help them mimic what this might sound like!
    – Get them to do the slides again in order to assess which notes can come through clearly

    I hope this helps but I imagine you’ve already tried – some male voices just don’t have much of a falsetto range..!

    #10408

    Andy Smith
    Participant
    @Andy_Smith
    Points: 62.507

    Thank you. I’ve tried some of that, but what I have done you’re explaining it in a different way which might also help. I will report back…

    #11488

    Veronica Wakeling
    Participant
    @Veronica-Wakeling
    Points: 146.157

    I have mostly male students,Firstly I must be satisfied that they have a good breathing and support with muscular tension ,on the intercostal support,for that I use kinetic exercises of lifting a heavy stone with each arm up to chest level in order that they feel the rise.Then taking in a good breath through the nose keeping the voice above the larynx release going from the lowest comfortable register up the scale ,both sharps and flats on nggggggggggg.This also raises soft pallet.No pushing …no tightening…just a steady controlled air flow.This method was used by Jane Eaglan a dramatic soprano who had a throat operation and was told her career as an opera singer was over….It wasn,t…….

    #11489

    Veronica Wakeling
    Participant
    @Veronica-Wakeling
    Points: 146.157

    I have mostly male students,Firstly I must be satisfied that they have a good breathing and support with muscular tension ,on the intercostal support,for that I use kinetic exercises of lifting a heavy stone with each arm up to chest level in order that they feel the rise.Then taking in a good breath through the nose keeping the voice above the larynx release going from the lowest comfortable register up the scale ,both sharps and flats on nggggggggggg.This also raises soft pallet.No pushing …no tightening…just a steady controlled air flow.This method was used by Jane Eaglan a dramatic soprano who had a throat operation and was told her career as an opera singer was over….It wasn,t…….

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