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What kind of methods and techniques do you use? (Singing Teachers)

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    Topic
  • #5558

    Matt Pocock
    Participant

    Hey all, hope you’re having a great week 🙂 Would be really interested to know what kind of methods and techniques you guys teach with! Let’s compare some notes 🙂

Viewing 12 replies - 21 through 32 (of 32 total)
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  • #5581

    Kat Hunter
    Participant
    @Kat_Hunter
    Points: 5

    PS. I read in Titze’s book, Vocology, that there’s strong evidence to suggest that motor learning is actually MORE effective when students are not thinking about the physical processes involved in the task. There are probably many differing studies on this, but there is a large proponent of thought that believes that when a sportsman, dancer, or performer is able to focus only on their own sensation during the act, rather than the movement of specific muscles and cartilages, that motor learning is adopted much faster. Just food for thought. This is especially profound when you consider that much of the vocal mechanism cannot be directly felt or seen. YES, a scientific approach from the teacher’s point of view is vital, but if one of my students just needed to lower their larynx to sing better, I would prefer to give them a larynx lowering exercise as soon as they walk in the door, so that they can first experience what it feels like. And then when they can identify with the greater vocal ease that that exercise brings, then, if they ask to know more of the science, I will tell them. I think at least that way, the scientific learning doesn’t take place in a vacuum. Just my own personal take on it.

    #5582

    Kat Hunter
    Participant
    @Kat_Hunter
    Points: 5

    PPS. I think you also have to change your tactic for different students, obviously. If a student only has a month of lessons with me before he goes on a cruise ship or before he goes on tour, the science is 100% only on a need-to-know basis. However if the student is not a performer and has a scientific mind, then obviously I am happy to explain things in greater detail with time.

    #5583

    Eliza Jane Fyfe
    Participant
    @Eliza-Fyfe
    Points: 90

    Kat you are so well read in this!!!!!

    #5584

    Kat Hunter
    Participant
    @Kat_Hunter
    Points: 5

    Haha I’m just a nerd, really 😛

    #5585

    Matt Pocock
    Participant
    @mattpocock
    Points: 10

    Kat Wells – you are definitely my kind of nerd 🙂 I think if we could get together a group reading list of books that we found helpful for different methodologies that would be a great way of getting the knowledge of the group up. I’ll start a note now 🙂

    #5586

    Matt Pocock
    Participant
    @mattpocock
    Points: 10

    Also, fascinating to read about the transference of effort from the TA to the CT – I’d never considered that as a possibility for registration shift. Where did you read/learn that?

    #5587

    Kat Hunter
    Participant
    @Kat_Hunter
    Points: 5

    Yes! Nerd club! I love it. Pretty much everyone i’ve read says that the TA and CT muscles are involved with pitch making. This is a pretty good website that talks about that stuff and other stuff too http://www.lionsvoiceclinic.umn.edu/page2.htm. Obviously the adductor muscles (interarytenoids, and lateral cricoarytenoids) have to be involved to some degree across the board to ensure adduction, but the thyroarytenoid and cricothyroid as far as I know generally share the responsibility of pitch making (much like a tug of war). As you might well know, the TAs make the folds shorter and thicker, and the CTs stretch the folds out.

    #5588

    Matt Pocock
    Participant
    @mattpocock
    Points: 10

    Epic – now write us a reading list, Kat! With your crazy knowledge you’re currently our queen nerd, but I want to be hot on your tails by this time next week.

    #5589

    Kat Hunter
    Participant
    @Kat_Hunter
    Points: 5

    Haha, will do! There’s lots that I still haven’t got around to reading yet, but I’ll contribute. Regarding your list, the only one I’ve read so far is the book by Gillyanne Kayes. My old opera-singing housemate studied with her and said she was amazing. I think the book has some great parts, but man, I just couldn’t do half the exercises haha. I think if I poke around my throat for too long, I gross myself out 😛

    #5590

    Matt Pocock
    Participant
    @mattpocock
    Points: 10

    One of my students once said “Do I have to keep bloody prodding myself?” – Couldn’t have put it better myself!

    #5591

    Eliza Jane Fyfe
    Participant
    @Eliza-Fyfe
    Points: 90

    What style of singing do you guys tend to teach?

    #5592

    Beckie Tunnicliffe
    Participant
    @Beckie_Oldham
    Points: 24

    I teach a lot of popular vocals such as pop, Rnb, rock etc and a little bit of musical theatre 🙂 I think in the whole time I’ve been teaching I’ve only ever had two people ask me for classical lessons

Viewing 12 replies - 21 through 32 (of 32 total)

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